Further Reading
Everything I Have Learned About Values

This slender book is a rare gift: a distilled compilation of the most profound insights that the ever-brilliant Richard Barrett has accumulated over decades of path-breaking work. If every individual and organisation used Richard’s frameworks to guide their actions, our world would be a blessed place.

Raj Sisodia, FW Olin Distinguished Professor of Global Business, Babson College, Co-founder & Chairman Emeritus, Conscious Capitalism Inc., USA.

Further Reading
Love, Fear and the Destiny
of Nations

Love, Fear and the Destiny of Nations provides a historical perspective on the impact of the evolution of human consciousness on world affairs.

More Information

Every human being makes decisions about how to get their needs met based on their worldview. In addition to having a worldview, every human being ives inside a worldview—the worldview of the community/nation to which they belong. As long as your personal worldview is closely aligned with the worldview of your family/community/nation you will feel a sense of inclusion—a sense of belonging. If your worldview does not align with the worldview of your family/community/nation you will feel a sense of exclusion.

What is a worldview?

A worldview is a set of beliefs which enables you to interpret (give meaning to) what is happening in the world around you—the world you personally identify with—and based on the  interpretation you give, your worldview helps you decide what actions to take so you can get your needs met. Consequently, your worldview is significantly influenced by the needs of the stage of psychological development you have reached and the unmet needs of the stages of psychological development you have passed through that remain unsatisfied—the needs you have not yet mastered.

Worldviews in communities and nations

In democratic regimes, the worldview of the collective—the community/nation—is a reflection of the worldview of the majority of the population. This worldview dictates the way in which the community or nation is governed—the governance structures, policies, systems and procedures. Differing worldviews are tolerated in democratic regimes to the extent they do not break the community’s or nation’s laws. Worldviews evolve or regress in democratic regimes when the conditions experienced by majority of the population are no longer tolerable—when a significant mass of population cannot get their needs met.

In authoritarian regimes, the worldview of the collective--community/nation is a reflection of the worldview of the leader. Worldviews evolve or regress in authoritarian regimes when the conditions experienced by the elites are no longer tolerable—when the worldview of the leader does not allow them to get their needs met.

When a significant proportion of the population in either a democratic or autocratic regime begins to operate from a higher stage of psychological development than the collective stage of development of the community/nation, there will be mounting societal pressure to shift to a higher order worldview. This mounting pressure, which shows up as social unrest, is a sign that certain segments of the community or nation are not getting their needs met.

Examples of this type of social unrest include the Arab Spring which began in 2010 and continued throughout 2011, and the political and economic restructuring of the Soviet Union which led to the fall of the iron curtain in 1991. Other examples of mounting societal pressure which are linked to unmet needs and a shift to a higher order worldview (stage of psychological development) include the anti-slavery campaigns of the 18th century, the suffragette movement of the late 19th and early 20th century, the Occupy Wall Street movement in 2011 and the LGBT marches and demonstrations in recent years.

Conversely, when an increasingly significant proportion of the population regresses to a lower stage of psychological development (level of consciousness) than the collective stage of development of a community/nation—when this population group gets left behind—there will be mounting societal pressure to shift to a lower order worldview—a worldview which is less inclusive. Examples of this type of shift include the Brexit phenomenon and the election of Donald Trump in 2016.

We can conclude that all forms of social unrest are a sign that a significant number of people are: a) not getting their needs met, and b) calling for an upward or downward shift in the collective worldview of the community/nation.

Worldviews as levels of identity/awareness

At the present time in our human history, there are nine active worldviews in individuals but only four active worldviews in nations. The nine worldviews are shown in the following table. The focus of each worldview is shown in Column 2. In Column 3, you find the corresponding stage of individual psychological development. Please note there are three worldviews that correspond to the differentiating stage of development. Which of these worldviews you align with depend to a large extent on your experiences during your childhood and teenage years. If you were abused, you may seek to differentiate yourself (get the recognition your ego needs) by seeking power and developing your strength. If you did not feel accepted, you may seek to differentiate by seeking to become an authority by pursuing your education. If you did not feel recognized, you may seek to differentiate by seeking fame and fortune, thereby enhancing your status.

The middle four worldviews--State Awareness, National Awareness, Wealth Awareness and People Awareness are currently the only active world views at a national level. The worldview of Clan Awareness is found in some isolated groups. The worldview of Tribe Awareness is found in many ethnically focused communities around the world.

The formation of your worldview

Worldviews are comprised of three types of belief system: a personal belief system, a cultural belief system, and a cosmological belief system. Every worldview is a blend of these three belief systems.

Cosmological belief systems

A cosmological belief system defines our place in the universe: it explains the origin and structure of our material world, our relationship to other dimensions of existence, and most importantly, how we should conduct and align ourselves with whomever or whatever we consider to be the “divine” creator/provider so that we can get our needs met in this life and the next.

Unlike the other cosmological beliefs systems, the scientific cosmology in the worldview of Wealth Awareness only describes the origin and structure of our material world. There is no divine creator/provider in science and there are no other dimensions of existence. From the scientific standpoint, when you die, that’s the end of it. For this reason, I refer to science as a non-transcendent cosmology: there is no room for God, the soul or other dimensions of existence in science.

Cultural belief systems

A cultural belief system defines how we relate to other members of our (ethnic) community, and how we should conduct ourselves in that community in order to get our needs met on a day-to-day basis. This belief system is based on the collective history of the group.

Personal belief systems

A personal belief system defines how we believe we should react or respond to what is happening to us moment to moment so we can get our personal needs met. This belief system will always reflect the priorities of the Stage of Psychological Development we have reached and the unmet needs we still have from previous stages of psychological development that we have not yet mastered.

Video: Priorities for the Evolution of Human Consciousness

 

Sign up for the news from The Barrett Academy

Phone: +44 7408 879 409

Email: info@barrettacademy.com

Submitting Form...

The server encountered an error.

Form received.

Every human being makes decisions about how to get their needs met based on their worldview. In addition to having a worldview, every human being ives inside a worldview—the worldview of the community/nation to which they belong. As long as your personal worldview is closely aligned with the worldview of your family/community/nation you will feel a sense of inclusion—a sense of belonging. If your worldview does not align with the worldview of your family/community/nation you will feel a sense of exclusion.

What is a worldview?

A worldview is a set of beliefs which enables you to interpret (give meaning to) what is happening in the world around you—the world you personally identify with—and based on the  interpretation you give, your worldview helps you decide what actions to take so you can get your needs met. Consequently, your worldview is significantly influenced by the needs of the stage of psychological development you have reached and the unmet needs of the stages of psychological development you have passed through that remain unsatisfied—the needs you have not yet mastered.

Worldviews in communities and nations

In democratic regimes, the worldview of the collective—the community/nation—is a reflection of the worldview of the majority of the population. This worldview dictates the way in which the community or nation is governed—the governance structures, policies, systems and procedures. Differing worldviews are tolerated in democratic regimes to the extent they do not break the community’s or nation’s laws. Worldviews evolve or regress in democratic regimes when the conditions experienced by majority of the population are no longer tolerable—when a significant mass of population cannot get their needs met.

In authoritarian regimes, the worldview of the collective--community/nation is a reflection of the worldview of the leader. Worldviews evolve or regress in authoritarian regimes when the conditions experienced by the elites are no longer tolerable—when the worldview of the leader does not allow them to get their needs met.

When a significant proportion of the population in either a democratic or autocratic regime begins to operate from a higher stage of psychological development than the collective stage of development of the community/nation, there will be mounting societal pressure to shift to a higher order worldview. This mounting pressure, which shows up as social unrest, is a sign that certain segments of the community or nation are not getting their needs met.

Examples of this type of social unrest include the Arab Spring which began in 2010 and continued throughout 2011, and the political and economic restructuring of the Soviet Union which led to the fall of the iron curtain in 1991. Other examples of mounting societal pressure which are linked to unmet needs and a shift to a higher order worldview (stage of psychological development) include the anti-slavery campaigns of the 18th century, the suffragette movement of the late 19th and early 20th century, the Occupy Wall Street movement in 2011 and the LGBT marches and demonstrations in recent years.

Conversely, when an increasingly significant proportion of the population regresses to a lower stage of psychological development (level of consciousness) than the collective stage of development of a community/nation—when this population group gets left behind—there will be mounting societal pressure to shift to a lower order worldview—a worldview which is less inclusive. Examples of this type of shift include the Brexit phenomenon and the election of Donald Trump in 2016.

We can conclude that all forms of social unrest are a sign that a significant number of people are: a) not getting their needs met, and b) calling for an upward or downward shift in the collective worldview of the community/nation.

Worldviews as levels of identity/awareness

At the present time in our human history, there are nine active worldviews in individuals but only four active worldviews in nations. The nine worldviews are shown in the following table. The focus of each worldview is shown in Column 2. In Column 3, you find the corresponding stage of individual psychological development. Please note there are three worldviews that correspond to the differentiating stage of development. Which of these worldviews you align with depend to a large extent on your experiences during your childhood and teenage years. If you were abused, you may seek to differentiate yourself (get the recognition your ego needs) by seeking power and developing your strength. If you did not feel accepted, you may seek to differentiate by seeking to become an authority by pursuing your education. If you did not feel recognized, you may seek to differentiate by seeking fame and fortune, thereby enhancing your status.

The middle four worldviews--State Awareness, National Awareness, Wealth Awareness and People Awareness are currently the only active world views at a national level. The worldview of Clan Awareness is found in some isolated groups. The worldview of Tribe Awareness is found in many ethnically focused communities around the world.

The formation of your worldview

Worldviews are comprised of three types of belief system: a personal belief system, a cultural belief system, and a cosmological belief system. Every worldview is a blend of these three belief systems.

Cosmological belief systems

A cosmological belief system defines our place in the universe: it explains the origin and structure of our material world, our relationship to other dimensions of existence, and most importantly, how we should conduct and align ourselves with whomever or whatever we consider to be the “divine” creator/provider so that we can get our needs met in this life and the next.

Unlike the other cosmological beliefs systems, the scientific cosmology in the worldview of Wealth Awareness only describes the origin and structure of our material world. There is no divine creator/provider in science and there are no other dimensions of existence. From the scientific standpoint, when you die, that’s the end of it. For this reason, I refer to science as a non-transcendent cosmology: there is no room for God, the soul or other dimensions of existence in science.

Cultural belief systems

A cultural belief system defines how we relate to other members of our (ethnic) community, and how we should conduct ourselves in that community in order to get our needs met on a day-to-day basis. This belief system is based on the collective history of the group.

Personal belief systems

A personal belief system defines how we believe we should react or respond to what is happening to us moment to moment so we can get our personal needs met. This belief system will always reflect the priorities of the Stage of Psychological Development we have reached and the unmet needs we still have from previous stages of psychological development that we have not yet mastered.

Worldviews and their corresponding cosmology
 

Video: Priorities for the Evolution of Human Consciousness

 

Every human being makes decisions about how to get their needs met based on their worldview. In addition to having a worldview, every human being ives inside a worldview—the worldview of the community/nation to which they belong. As long as your personal worldview is closely aligned with the worldview of your family/community/nation you will feel a sense of inclusion—a sense of belonging. If your worldview does not align with the worldview of your family/community/nation you will feel a sense of exclusion.

What is a worldview?

A worldview is a set of beliefs which enables you to interpret (give meaning to) what is happening in the world around you—the world you personally identify with—and based on the  interpretation you give, your worldview helps you decide what actions to take so you can get your needs met. Consequently, your worldview is significantly influenced by the needs of the stage of psychological development you have reached and the unmet needs of the stages of psychological development you have passed through that remain unsatisfied—the needs you have not yet mastered.

Worldviews in communities and nations

In democratic regimes, the worldview of the collective—the community/nation—is a reflection of the worldview of the majority of the population. This worldview dictates the way in which the community or nation is governed—the governance structures, policies, systems and procedures. Differing worldviews are tolerated in democratic regimes to the extent they do not break the community’s or nation’s laws. Worldviews evolve or regress in democratic regimes when the conditions experienced by majority of the population are no longer tolerable—when a significant mass of population cannot get their needs met.

In authoritarian regimes, the worldview of the collective--community/nation is a reflection of the worldview of the leader. Worldviews evolve or regress in authoritarian regimes when the conditions experienced by the elites are no longer tolerable—when the worldview of the leader does not allow them to get their needs met.

When a significant proportion of the population in either a democratic or autocratic regime begins to operate from a higher stage of psychological development than the collective stage of development of the community/nation, there will be mounting societal pressure to shift to a higher order worldview. This mounting pressure, which shows up as social unrest, is a sign that certain segments of the community or nation are not getting their needs met.

Examples of this type of social unrest include the Arab Spring which began in 2010 and continued throughout 2011, and the political and economic restructuring of the Soviet Union which led to the fall of the iron curtain in 1991. Other examples of mounting societal pressure which are linked to unmet needs and a shift to a higher order worldview (stage of psychological development) include the anti-slavery campaigns of the 18th century, the suffragette movement of the late 19th and early 20th century, the Occupy Wall Street movement in 2011 and the LGBT marches and demonstrations in recent years.

Conversely, when an increasingly significant proportion of the population regresses to a lower stage of psychological development (level of consciousness) than the collective stage of development of a community/nation—when this population group gets left behind—there will be mounting societal pressure to shift to a lower order worldview—a worldview which is less inclusive. Examples of this type of shift include the Brexit phenomenon and the election of Donald Trump in 2016.

We can conclude that all forms of social unrest are a sign that a significant number of people are: a) not getting their needs met, and b) calling for an upward or downward shift in the collective worldview of the community/nation.

Worldviews as levels of identity/awareness

At the present time in our human history, there are nine active worldviews in individuals but only four active worldviews in nations. The nine worldviews are shown in the following table. The focus of each worldview is shown in Column 2. In Column 3, you find the corresponding stage of individual psychological development. Please note there are three worldviews that correspond to the differentiating stage of development. Which of these worldviews you align with depend to a large extent on your experiences during your childhood and teenage years. If you were abused, you may seek to differentiate yourself (get the recognition your ego needs) by seeking power and developing your strength. If you did not feel accepted, you may seek to differentiate by seeking to become an authority by pursuing your education. If you did not feel recognized, you may seek to differentiate by seeking fame and fortune, thereby enhancing your status.

The middle four worldviews--State Awareness, National Awareness, Wealth Awareness and People Awareness are currently the only active world views at a national level. The worldview of Clan Awareness is found in some isolated groups. The worldview of Tribe Awareness is found in many ethnically focused communities around the world.

The formation of your worldview

Worldviews are comprised of three types of belief system: a personal belief system, a cultural belief system, and a cosmological belief system. Every worldview is a blend of these three belief systems.

Cosmological belief systems

A cosmological belief system defines our place in the universe: it explains the origin and structure of our material world, our relationship to other dimensions of existence, and most importantly, how we should conduct and align ourselves with whomever or whatever we consider to be the “divine” creator/provider so that we can get our needs met in this life and the next.

Unlike the other cosmological beliefs systems, the scientific cosmology in the worldview of Wealth Awareness only describes the origin and structure of our material world. There is no divine creator/provider in science and there are no other dimensions of existence. From the scientific standpoint, when you die, that’s the end of it. For this reason, I refer to science as a non-transcendent cosmology: there is no room for God, the soul or other dimensions of existence in science.

Cultural belief systems

A cultural belief system defines how we relate to other members of our (ethnic) community, and how we should conduct ourselves in that community in order to get our needs met on a day-to-day basis. This belief system is based on the collective history of the group.

Personal belief systems

A personal belief system defines how we believe we should react or respond to what is happening to us moment to moment so we can get our personal needs met. This belief system will always reflect the priorities of the Stage of Psychological Development we have reached and the unmet needs we still have from previous stages of psychological development that we have not yet mastered.

Worldviews and their corresponding cosmology
 

Video: Priorities for the Evolution of Human Consciousness